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  • Dr. Veara Pack-Butler, LCPC, NCC

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    My specialties include working with clients who have experienced trauma, working with members of the Christian community, and working with children. I have spent my career working with at-risk populations and have experience working in juvenile detention centers, committed facilities, on crisis stabilization teams, and in the community. I really enjoy connecting with clients in a collaborative process to help each person find their path toward healing. My life’s work has been assisting people with making lasting changes and healing from their traumatic experiences. My favorite go-to phrase is, “our perceptions are filtered through our experiences.” Meaning trauma changes the way we see our world. Helping clients along their healing journey is done using a myriad of therapy techniques and modalities, including trauma-informed care, Cognitive Process Therapy, Psychodynamic, CBT, and Solution-Focused Therapy wrapped in a Person-Centered approach. 

    Training:

    EMDR, Prolonged Exposure Therapy, CBT-Depression, Trauma, DBT

    Education: 

    I graduated from the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) with a Bachelor of Arts degree, majoring in Psychology and minoring in Africana Studies. I also had the distinct honor of becoming a McNair Scholar. After attending UMBC, I received my Master of Science degree from Capella University. While completing my graduate program, I served three years as President of Chi Upsilon Chi, Capella’s chapter of Chi Sigma Iota, an international honor society for counselors. Recently, I defended my dissertation on Black women and their experiences of microaggressions at Capella University, I am now Dr. Pack-Butler!

     

     

    Licenses and Certifications:

    Licensed Clinical Professional CounselorSupervisor

    Licensed Professional Counselor in Virginia and D.C.

    National Certified Counselor

    Certified Clinical Trauma Specialist-Individual

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